8.
Alaska's Copper River forms the western border of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park   Copper River Country has many
wilderness watercourses
The rivers and streams of Alaska's Copper River country are home to salmon, grayling, dolly varden, and other fish species. Wildlife lingers along the shores of these watercourses, seeking food, water, and cooling breezes. For travelers with a yen for adventure, many of these watercourses can be navigated. Most major rivers here are glacial in origin, with waters that are cold and silty, carrying fine particles ground out of mountain rocks by the slow-moving ice from which their headwaters flow. Tributary streams may be fed by springs or by snow melt, and are often clear and swift.
   
Learn about all of this and more!
Reserve your place in Wellwood's

Talk and Walk Through
the Natural World of
Copper River Country
 

As you explore Alaska's Copper River Basin, you might be interested in some of the characteristics and features of its waterways:
• The Copper River
x -flows out of the Copper Glacier on Mt. Wrangell
x -traverses about 300 miles from glacier to sea
x -drains an area of about 26,500 square miles
x -carries one of the world's largest sediment loads
x -is host to the most prized salmon fisheries in Alaska
• The Gulkana River
x -is one of Alaska's most popular rivers for rafting, boating,
xxand king salmon fishing
x -has North America's northern-most population of steelhead
• The Tazlina River
x -gets its name from the Ahtna word for "swift river"
x -drains 21-mile long Tazlina Lake, at the end of Tazlina Glacier
• The Klutina River
x -provided a hazardous passage into the Copper River area
xxfor early seekers of Alaskan gold
x -gets its name from the Ahtna word for "head water river"
• The Tonsina River
x -flows from Tonsina Lake, formed by Tonsina Glacier
x -forms a beautiful gorge visible from trails near
xxWellwood Bed and Breakfast
• During summer, area rivers contain red, king, and silver salmon
• River shores are excellent places to spot bears, moose,
xxnesting bald eagles, and other Alaskan wildlife
• Many river names end in "na", the Ahtna word for "river"

Call us! 907-822-3418
To return to the Wellwood Bed and Breakfast home page, click here.
www.wellwoodcenter.com | Copyright © 2009 Wellwood Center. All rights reserved.
Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center Go to maps location maps for Wellwood Center